Dean Regas

Out-of-this-World Speaker

As the co-host of PBS' Star Gazers I bring the wonder of the night sky to TV sets around the country and embody the phrase, "Keep Looking Up!"  As the Outreach Astronomer for the Cincinnati Observatory since 2000, I communicate my love of astronomy through 200 lectures per year to people of all ages. I combine knowledge, charisma, and technology to deliver multi-media presentations on topics that appeal to a diverse audience. My engaging style involves a lot of humor and I’ve been dubbed by many students, “The Stand-Up Comedian of Astronomy.”  Whether I'm talking about stars, planets, comets, or black holes, I bring the complicated field of astronomy down to Earth for any audience.  Please peruse my sample lecture topics and let me know if I can share my love of the universe with you.


Lecture Topics

Tour of the Universe: You Are Here

Rocket through space and sail among billions of stars and galaxies. Utilizing some amazing simulation software Dean Regas guides you through the mind-boggling scale of the universe. Along the way you’ll stop at the Moon and individual planets. Then you’ll make the jump to light speed and head to interstellar space and see all the galaxies in the universe. Don’t worry, he’ll have you back home in time for dinner.   

I Want to Believe: Returning to an Age of Reason

After 15 years of public speaking at the Cincinnati Observatory, Dean Regas has heard every astronomy conspiracy theory and doomsday prediction in the universe – and frankly, he’s worried. He’s worried that we are slipping into an age of growing superstition. In this rational, often humorous lecture, Dean tackles such controversial topics as: The Mayan Calendar, Moon landing, UFO sightings, Doomsday Comets, Astrology, and the Star of Bethlehem. The truth is out there and Dean shows why it is important to confront superstitions head-on and how you can champion a new age of reason. 

Archeoastronomy: Ancient Paths of the Sun, Moon, and Stars

Astronomy was everywhere in the ancient world. If you look at the oldest surviving works of art and architecture, you find astronomy within them: Cave paintings in France, pyramids in Egypt, intricate mounds in the Americas. Civilizations expressed and celebrated their knowledge of this oldest science through works of art and monumental construction projects. Take a journey with Dean to explore these amazing archeoastronomy sites and discover more of what the ancients knew about the universe. 

Comets and Meteors: Shaking Up and Waking Up Astronomers

When something new appears in the night sky, everyone takes notice. Historically comets portended gloom and doom as a change to the status quo. Now, astronomers can’t wait for a chance to observe and study them when they wander close to Earth like Comet ISON, a large and potentially bright comet is coming in November. And when a meteor hits the Earth like the one that exploded above Russia in February, you can’t help but look up. This lecture explores where these sudden visitors come from and what we can do to protect ourselves from the next, “Big One.” 

Mythology for Adults: Ancient Star Stories You Can’t Tell the Kids

Constellation mythology speaks to students of all ages. However, some of them were not meant for younger ears. Dean will share the best, grossest, sexiest stellar legends from Greek mythology including Zeus’ affairs, gory deaths, the castration of Uranus ,and the real origin-story for the goddess Venus. This uncensored, adults-only version will have you cringing and laughing like an ancient Greek. 

Eclipse Chasing: Heavenly Excuses to Travel

A total solar eclipse is the most spectacular natural event you can ever witness. The Moon glides slowly in front of the Sun and at just the right moment, in just the right place, the Moon completely covers the Sun. Dean Regas shares his adventures traveling around the world in search of solar eclipses, lunar eclipses, transits, and other astronomical events. 

Through the Looking Glass: An Olde-Fashioned Slide Show

In 1998 the Cincinnati Observatory unearthed a photographic gold mine in their attic: 1200 glass plates of astronomical images. Dean Regas would like to share some of them with you in an old-fashioned slide show, using a period projector. These historic glass plates from the Observatory's unique collection tell of its heritage and early star gazing events of the late 1800s and early 1900s.


Want to have Dean speak to your group? 

Please contact:
Dean Regas
513-321-5186

dean@cincinnatiobservatory.org